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Messages - tbrbeast

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16
General Discussion / Re: Elephant gets prosthetic!!
« on: August 17, 2009, 05:20:40 PM »
According to the news article I saw, this is the second with a prosthetic leg.  The first is a 3 year old. 

17
General Discussion / Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« on: August 17, 2009, 05:18:23 PM »
Joe - Saw a posting on another amp site where someone just got a new leg and was looking for new footwear.  He listed a couple of shoe brands that apparently work quite well for amputees.  Here they are:

   Spira Footwear; and
   Z-Coil.

I don't buy footwear over the internet for obvious reasons so I was concerned about finding local, reputable stores that carry these brands.  Both brands have stores in a reasonable proximity to me (within 200 miles) and which sell footwear or footwear related items (more likely to have knowledgeable staff).  Both have athletic and walking shoes; Spira also has a hiking boot.  I am going to check both of these out and may also be worthwhile for you.



18
General Discussion / Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« on: August 12, 2009, 05:59:07 PM »
As a diabetic and bilat TMA, I deal with shoe issues all the time.  Quite frankly, I see very little reason for most diabetics, including an amputee like myself, to buy diabetic shoes.  As has been noted/implied, styles leave a lot to be desired.  Either buy off-the-shelf or go custom made.  If you buy off-the-shelf, look for shoes with a tall and wide toe box.  New Balance and Brooks are 2 that I know for a fact make models that fit that criteria.  This is one situation where it pays to go to a store where the salespeople are knowledgeable in shoes and fitting them.  You can buy cheap and without good advice/help but as diabetics, the risk just isn't worth it.  Once you find something that fits, make sure your orthotic fits.  Those 2 items are the primary criteria I use when I buy footwear and I have been buying off-the-shelf since becoming an amp 5 1/2 years ago. 

When I get a prescription for new orthoses, I tell my surgeon what types of footwear I am looking at these being used with.  He has written the type on the scrip for the orthotist.  I am seriously exploring starting XC skiing again which is likely to require a different or modified orthosis for each foot.  But for most footwear, my experience suggests that if I am dealing with a tall and wide toe box, then my orthoses are likely to fit most footwear without little or no problem.

I think your orthotist and prosthetist need to talk and coordinate their work.  One shouldn't be making/adjusting one side without a comparable adjustment/compensation (or at least a check to verify no problems or changes are necessary) at the same time. 

19
General Discussion / Re: members?????
« on: May 11, 2009, 04:43:30 PM »
Dick - there is a deer repellent made from the urine of cougar which at one time in the not all that distant past did roam PA.  Results are variable - lot of the timber companies and large landowners used it in the past with mixed results. 

I tend to lean to toward PLJs idea that you have gophers not moles. 

As for lion dung pellets, you might check with your local zoo.  In Portland, OR, you used to be able to buy fertilizer made from elephant dung (and I think you still can). 

As for other methods of mole or gopher control, check with your county extension agent or local wildlife agency (especially if they are gophers).  Sometimes a local parks department also can help.

20
My History / Re: Hi from a newbie.. My story
« on: May 07, 2009, 05:35:09 PM »
Welcome to the forum.  I am also a diabetic.  I am also a bilat transmet amp (no toes either foot) as a result (diagnosed at the same time I lost the toes on the right foot).  

First, what you are experiencing and going through is totally normal.  

Second, see if you can find a local amputee support group in your area, contact them and ask to speak with another amputee, preferably one with a similar amputation.  Ask lots of questions.  If you can't find a group or the distance is too great, contact the Amputee Coalition of America (ACA).  They have a great website with lots of information but more important for you, they have a program called Peer Visitation.  Peer visitors are amputees who volunteer their time to talk with and support people facing amputation or who have had one.  The visit or visits can be in person, over the phone, by email etc.; your choice.  Key here is information.  Many of us didn't have this option; I don't want someone else to go through what I did because someone didn't think to tell them or help them to locate resources, etc.

3.  Find a good leg man or woman.  Do it before your surgery.  Interview as many as you can until you find someone you like and trust.  Ask your doctor, your surgeon, other amps who they recommend and why.  You are going to essentially live with this individual for a very long time so you need to be able to believe in and trust them.

4.  Talk with your surgeon well before the surgery.  Find out what he/she is going to do, why and how.  If at all possible, if they haven't done it before, get your surgeon together with your leg person so that each understands what is needed on both ends to make this work with the least impact to you.  You don't want your surgeon doing something that prohibits or limits what type or types of prosthetics you can use.  You might also ask if your surgeon has talked with a vascular specialist, again to make sure that there won't be any problems down the road.  From what I keep hearing, this usually isn't done but perhaps should be part of the process.

5.  Make sure your blood sugars are under control.  With 20 years of experience, this should be old hat.  If they are, healing will be faster and easier.

I know this is a tough time for you.  Fortunately, things are as bad as they seem.  You are gaining another full time job.  Frankly, and given my druthers, I would much rather be an amp than a diabetic but I am both so I have to deal with it.  Both are 24/7/365 with no vacations, piss poor pay, and no benefits but lots of expenses.  I can be done; members here are proof of it.  

I am sure that others here, who are leg amps, will also respond with additional information.  Knowledge in this game is power and will make it easier for you to get through this.  

Keep us informed of your progress.

21
Health and Fitness / Phantom Pain Research Project
« on: March 19, 2009, 03:29:22 PM »
Here is some info on a research project on phantom pain being done out of Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) in Portland, OR.  I also posted this in the General Discussion section to make sure that the widest possible audience can see it.

From:  Oregon Health And Science University (OHSU)

Contact: Beth Darnell at OHSU via e-mail
<darnallb@ohsu.edu>

Have you had an amputation? Do you have phantom limb pain?

Researchers at OHSU are looking for people to be part of a research
study investigating the effectiveness of mirror therapy. The study
procedures are not standard treatment. 

[You do not have to live in Oregon to participate]

Phantom limb pain is pain that seems to come from the arm or leg that
has been amputated.  To participate, you must be 18-65 years old with
phantom limb pain following amputation of all or part of an arm or
leg on one side of the body only.  Other eligibility criteria apply.

The study lasts for six months.We will show you how to do mirror
therapy at home and ask you to use it for a short time every day.  We
will send you questionnaires to fill out and mail back four times
over the six-month period.  You may continue your usual medications
and treatments during the study. 

There will be no cost to you for participating in this study.  If you
qualify, you will receive up to $90 for your participation. You may
or may not benefit from being in this study.

Principal Investigator:
Beth Darnall, PhD
OHSU Dept. of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd.
Portland, OR  97239
503-494-4351
IRB #4925
<darnallb@ohsu.edu>

22
General Discussion / Phantom Pain Research Project
« on: March 19, 2009, 03:27:24 PM »
Just saw the following information about a research project on phantom pain being done by Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) out of Portland, OR.  I have pasted a copy of the email with the pertinent info below.  I am posting this here to get the widest exposure but am also posting it in the health and fitness section just in case.

From:  Oregon Health And Science University (OHSU)

Contact: Beth Darnell at OHSU via e-mail
<darnallb@ohsu.edu>

Have you had an amputation? Do you have phantom limb pain?

Researchers at OHSU are looking for people to be part of a research
study investigating the effectiveness of mirror therapy. The study
procedures are not standard treatment. 

[You do not have to live in Oregon to participate]

Phantom limb pain is pain that seems to come from the arm or leg that
has been amputated.  To participate, you must be 18-65 years old with
phantom limb pain following amputation of all or part of an arm or
leg on one side of the body only.  Other eligibility criteria apply.

The study lasts for six months.We will show you how to do mirror
therapy at home and ask you to use it for a short time every day.  We
will send you questionnaires to fill out and mail back four times
over the six-month period.  You may continue your usual medications
and treatments during the study. 

There will be no cost to you for participating in this study.  If you
qualify, you will receive up to $90 for your participation. You may
or may not benefit from being in this study.

Principal Investigator:
Beth Darnall, PhD
OHSU Dept. of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd.
Portland, OR  97239
503-494-4351
IRB #4925
<darnallb@ohsu.edu>

23
General Discussion / Re: most common question you are asked
« on: February 20, 2009, 05:55:01 PM »
As a bilat transmet, I get:
 
  1.  How do you walk/how long did it take you to learn to walk?

   2.  How do you manage to balance?

   3.  What do you have in your shoes?

   4.  Are you diabetic?

24
General Discussion / Re: VP Debate
« on: October 14, 2008, 06:03:59 PM »
Steve - your post about vote by mail being an absentee ballot isn't totally correct.  In Oregon, we have vote by mail - all registered voters receive their ballots in the mail and can return them the same way.  No need to register for an absentee ballot although it is still available for those who will be out of state when the regular ballots are mailed.  Applies to all elections - local, state and federal.

25
General Discussion / Re: VP Debate
« on: October 14, 2008, 06:02:43 PM »
Steve - your post about vote by mail being an absentee ballot isn't totally correct.  In Oregon, we have vote by mail - all registered voters receive their ballots in the mail and can return them the same way.  No need to register for an absentee ballot although it is still available for those who will be out of state when the regular ballots are mailed.  Applies to all elections - local, state and federal.

26
General Discussion / Re: Stubbie feet ???
« on: August 04, 2008, 06:19:37 PM »
Kep - There is a gentleman in my local support group who is a bilat AKA.  He has stubbie peglegs.  I have only seen them once so my recollection may be a bit hazy.  It sticks in my mind that he has a pair of wood legs that appear to be about 3-4 inches in diameter (no metal pylons).  The bottom appeared to be rubber or leather but there was no "foot" on either one.  Very much a low tech system (at least from what I could see) but he got around very well.  I saw them at a BBQ we had in the woods on a lake.  He walked quite easily through the woods and went sailing without any problems that I am aware of.  If you would like, I can try and contact him and see what he says.  I won't make any promises but might be worth a try. 

27
General Discussion / Re: Does anyone here smoke pot?
« on: July 15, 2008, 05:00:38 PM »
Snowbear - not necessarily.  As Teo pointed out, CA and CO have medical marijuana laws.  We also have them here in OR.  The law limits the amount of pot one can grow and/or have in possession and you must have a card and prescription from a doctor.  There have been abuses in the past and there are questions about use outside of work hours (rights of employers/drug free workplace vs. medical).  Obvious the elephant in the room is the federal govt which doesn't particularly like those laws (at least under the current administration) although we rarely hear reports about the feds busting those using for medicinal reasons.

I never have and have no intention of using pot for any reason.  But it apparently works for at least some people. 

28
General Discussion / Re: treatment by others
« on: July 11, 2008, 05:44:41 PM »
As a bilateral TMA, my amputations are not noticeable.  Outdoors I use a walking stick to help maintain my balance but indoors I don't.  I wear normal shoes so there is no obvious clue there either.  People, if they do take the time to watch me walk, will see my weave down the street or hall and when I stand still, I tend to bend at the knees or lean against the wall or other object to maintain my balance.  If I wear shorts, someone paying attention will notice that the heels of my socks are well above the top of the back of my shoes.   Interestingly, to date, no one has noticed or commented about that to me (or perhaps I should say that I am not aware of anyone noticing). 

I guess I don't have a problem with people staring.  I don't even mind if they ask questions.  I do have a problem with the rude and other unacceptable comments.  Unfortunately, there are always going to be idiots and other inconsiderate louts.  In those cases, Darwin's Theory doesn't work fast enough!

29
General Discussion / Re: Membership
« on: July 09, 2008, 05:25:29 PM »
Stinker - I have had the same or similiar problems.  More often than not, I can't sign in or it takes 2 or more times before my login goes through.  Not fatal but definitely aggrevating.

30
General Discussion / Re: treatment by others
« on: July 09, 2008, 05:23:44 PM »
I have to agree: contact Days Inn.  The one you visited may be also be a franchisee.  Regardless, I would think that the company would want to know how their employees or their franchisees are doing business. 

I am not sure how relevant the comment about the Hindu or Indian population is.  Bad behavior is bad behavior regardless of religious orientation, national origin, or ethnicity.  There are still too many people of all races, religions, ethnicities, etc. who continue to think amputees shouldn't be seen or should be kept behind closed and locked doors.

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