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Messages - Robogirl

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1
Hi, Herb

It's kind of hard to describe; you really have to try it for yourself.  :)

2
Hi, Herb

I highly recommend the Echelon foot, especially for AK's.  I know people of all ages who are extremely happy with it, and the ones who haven't liked it are people who like to like to "rest" on their leg a lot (the foot will not stay stiff for that purpose...will tend to drift forward or backward).  The hydraulics keep the movement very smooth and natural, and allow you to walk downhill with your whole foot...not bouncing from your heel to toe...in a very controlled manner. Same with uphill.  You are not fighting to get over the toe when walking uphill; so much easier!

I know they have a 60-day trial period, and a 3-year warranty on the hydraulics (if anything goes wrong, they replace the whole thing, don't just repair it).  I've had mine for over a year and have had no problems. Only know just one man, personally, who had an issue...Endolite replaced the hydraulics and he has had no problems since.   I definitely think it is worth trying!  It is being covered by insurance now (I don't know cost), but if you need to pay out of pocket, maybe you can work something out with your prosthetist? 

You can also go on Endolite's website http://www.endolite.com/ for more info and pics.   

Oneblueleg, if you are reading this, please feel free to jump in and do a better job of explaining the foot.   :)     

3
I thought the same thing as Genki when I read your comment about training to use the microprocessor knee to go downhill.  Despite all kinds of coaching, I was never good at "riding the knee" down slopes....I had been used to a type of "free falling" I had done since I was a kid and had a hard time retraining my brain!  But the day I put the Echelon on, it worked perfectly with my Plie' knee and I didn't even have to think about how to walk down (or up) an incline!  It works just as well on a C-leg.  Definitely talk to your prosthetist about this foot.  It's one of the best prosthetic developments in YEARS (especially for AK's/knee-disartics).   

4
Hi, Hugh

You're doing the right thing, trying a variety of microprocessor knees. It also shows that your prosthetist is looking out for your best interests.  Definitely put them all through the paces! I wear the 1st generation Plie', but have tried the Plie' 2 and will be ordering one soon. I've been an amp for most of my life, and as a kid did not have the normal fears and concerns about falling and safety that many people who lose their leg(s) as an adult might. The Plie' feels very natural walking to me; I don't feel "computerized", if that makes sense, but it does have stumble recovery and has saved me from crashing to the ground many times for which I am grateful :).  Also tried the Rheo. First generation I absolutely hated, but the 2nd one I was impressed by. It's a little heavier and slower than I'd like, but a very nice, smooth walking knee. The C-leg is a little too "controlling" for me, but it is probably the safest of the 3 when it comes to doing things like jumping and knowing you will be "caught" when you land. Also good if you are going to get back to motorcycle riding because you can switch to a locking mode, which can't be done on the Plie' (not sure about Rheo knee). And golfers love it because you can set it to keep your knee bent and supporting during your swing! I wore a C-leg for 7 years before switching to the Plie', which I have worn for almost 3 years. Never wore the Rheo for more than an in-office trial, so I haven't had any real life experience with it. You might ask your prosthetist if he/she can make a duplicate socket for your Total Knee and you could use that for activities like running. Are you going to try different feet?  If so, you might want to try the Endolite Echelon. It is the BEST walking foot I've ever had...has a hydraulic ankle which is awesome on slopes, too...up and down very easy. Not the best running foot, but you could run on it if you had to. In my experience, it's best to have a separate running leg with high activity foot, otherwise it could be much too "bouncy" for everyday walking (unless you are a large or heavy person).

Good luck with your trials, and I look forward to hearing your thoughts!

5
General Discussion / Re: Special car hire in Florida?
« on: January 31, 2010, 06:01:29 PM »
All the major car rental companies lease cars with special equipment. I live in Orlando and know many people who were able to get these reservations with no problem. Being a major vacation destination, Orlando is very "tourist friendly."  8)  Your friend can try Hertz (international # is 1-800-654-3001); They should be able to accommodate him (or recommend another source), and they charge no additional fees for the equipment.  


 

6
General Discussion / Re: Has anyone seen the new AK leg?
« on: January 06, 2010, 09:32:15 PM »
Hi, Genki

I believe you saw the newest generation of the X-2 leg being developed by Otto Bock and tested at Walter Reed.  VERY exciting!  I just read an article about a soldier with a 4-inch residual limb who is jogging and jumping over hurdles with it!
http://www.wramc.army.mil/NewsAndEvents/media/resource/Lists/wrarticles/DispForm.aspx?Id=438&

7
Jordan Thomas is a 20-year-old bilateral amputee who lost his legs in a boating accident 4 years ago.  He started the Jordan Thomas Foundation to raise funds so that other children who need prosthetics and don't have the resources he did can get the help they need. To date the foundation has raised over $400K!!
You can read an article with more about Jordan and his nomination for CNN's "Hero of the Year" award using this link http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/vote/
What I wanted to mention here is that there is just one more week to vote (thru November 19), so please take a look and vote as many times as you can!   If Jordan wins this award it will bring awareness of the need for prosthetic insurance parity for over 2 Million amputees to a National audience!   You can help make this happen!  Vote now, and vote often!!!

Thanks!!!

8
General Discussion / Re: TRICK OR TREAT !!
« on: October 31, 2009, 04:10:59 PM »
Ann,

Ugh, re the baggy ankles!  ???   Is it because of movement of the Echelon foot?

9
General Discussion / Re: TRICK OR TREAT !!
« on: October 31, 2009, 03:47:06 PM »
I'm taking my little pumpkins out to trick or treat in our neighborhood tonight.   :)    One's dressing as a bumblebee and the other as "Nancy Drew".   Happy Halloween, everyone!!!


10
The argument that she can not work because of all the extra care her daughter needs is a real stretch....especially since she is doing so well. What in the world extra would she need to do for her besides normal child care? I was an amputee as a child and nothing kept me down, whether I was wearing my prosthesis or not!  And saying she needs a larger car to "fit" her daughter and her leg into is also a very weak argument.  Assuming the knee bends, how hard can it be for such a little thing fit the leg in a normal size car??? Really!  I'm sure the mom has enjoyed staying home with her child and collecting the grant money, but I don't think it's right that she do so at the taxpayer's expense.  Now if we were talking about a child confined to a wheelchair and needing special medical treatment on a regular basis and a specially equipped vehicle it would be a whole different story...in my opinion.  :)

11
What a bunch of boloney!   ::)   Mom is this girls biggest disability. 

12
General Discussion / Re: Waiting times
« on: September 24, 2009, 09:04:58 PM »
Do you think maybe it depends on where in the UK you live? There is a man fro the UK currently at my limb center here in the U.S. self-paying for a leg because he gave up on getting one through NHS.  He had to wait 18 months for an appt. to measure for a replacement prosthesis, then was told it would be a couple more weeks before test socket would be ready.  11 weeks later he was still waiting. He also asked about a replacement knee (hadn't received new one in over 10 years and current one was donated and is not in good condition), and was told that is another department and he'd have to make a separate appt. for that!?  Needless to say, he gave up and made arrangements to self-pay and get what he wants now (his daughter is here in the states, so that makes it easier).  He does say that emergency healthcare in the UK is Excellent.   Perhaps he's in one of those areas where there is a severe shortage of prosthetists???  It's sad!   :(

13
General Discussion / Re: new health care bill
« on: August 22, 2009, 04:58:22 PM »
Yes!  The insurance companies and those that have interest in them are spreading rumors and banking on the fear that they create.  My husband travels for business and has had the occasion to require medical treatment in different countries. He received EXCELLENT care each time at no cost to him. He said one of the best healthcare systems was in Taiwan, where an avg. family of 4 must pay $650/year, but all medical expenses are covered. They also have the option to get private insurance through their employers or on their own.  I think the U.S. has one of the most creative systems of government in the world, built on the foundation that its power comes from and is legitimized by the people. However, if our citizens are sick, then our goverment and our country are sick. It's time to lock the door on the political agendas as well as ignorant fear, and recognize who we are - human beings! We should work together as human beings who care about one another to create a new system of health care that is affordable and provides world-class service.  Until then, I agree with those of you who think our current healthcare system is out of control.   Just my humble opinion.   :)

14
General Discussion / Re: blister on end of stump
« on: August 01, 2009, 08:57:48 PM »
Jack,

Do NOT use the vacuum pump, whatever you do!  If you didn't have enough socks there was probably empty space in the socket and your vacuum system kept trying to pull you in, thus causing the blister.   Or you could have had too many socks on and not gotten all the way into the socket and been pulled into empty space that way.  Either way, you need to leave the liners off until it is healed unless it can be covered with a blister band-aid as Snow Bear suggested.  The chance of infection in an open sore in a high vacuum environment is too high. With an active vacuum system you have to be extra careful about perfect fit, as you have unfortunately found out!  Take care... and belated happy birthday to you!!!!!   

15
General Discussion / Re: Am I doing something dangerous?
« on: May 14, 2009, 10:37:12 PM »
Yeesh!  That doesn't sound good.  I once had a hydraulic knee unit that kept blowing out.  I loved it because it was small and light, but it didn't hold up.  Otto Bock kept replacing/rebuilding it for me, though, until they found a fix.  Hopefully that is what will happen with the Echelon. They offer an excellent warranty - will replace, not just repair, the entire foot during the warranty period, which is for 3 years.

Re the new C-leg, I know someone who works at Walter Reed who has seen it in "action" and it supposedly does some of what you describe, but not all (ie., salt water swimming, walking up stairs).  He said it'll probably be available to "the rest of us" at the end of this year.

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