Author Topic: Knee problems  (Read 1903 times)

Offline Steve C

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Knee problems
« on: September 23, 2011, 08:19:19 AM »
I have had a problem with my knee and my prosthetic leg. It started when I was shoveling topsoil (then wheelbarrow it up a hill) a few weeks back. Even though I wore my 'work leg' (the one that is too big and so has loading of padding) I still found it very painful at the end of the day. I couldn't even wear the leg in the evenings.
What it appeared to be the problem was the right edge of my knee cap. I found that spot problematic when I was wearing my new (less padding) leg but it always seemed fine with the old one. No so anymore. I thought that when I finished with the topsoil and the leg had some time without physical labour that it would be fine. Yesterday I did a bit of labour but for only a few hours and sure enough that spot acted up again.
It seems that that the right edge of my knee cap is a bit swollen pretty much all the time now.

Has anyone had this happen to them and what can be done about it?
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2011, 05:37:01 PM »
Yup sure have and this is how and why , first off check your sockets and make sure that they are not pushing on your kneecap, i didnt notice it but one set that i had made was doing just that. Puting unwanted pressure on the kneecap, they cut the socket back to that it would not touch my knee cap and i had no more trouble with a sore knee,

P.S. HOPE THIS HAS HELP YOU OUT.
you-all have a great day.

Offline Steve C

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2011, 07:22:44 AM »
I think my confusion comes from after having the leg for about 9-10 years and never a problem. The prosthetist did cover the edge with a thin piece of leather as the sleeve was being cut by that edge, but I can't think that it would be the cause of the pain as it felt fine before I dealt with the topsoil work. I wonder if I did something to my knee cap...
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline herb

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2011, 07:42:18 PM »
Hi Steve
It might be time to invest in a tractor with a bucket loader. I have three tractors and could not get my work done without them. In the meantime it would be good to get a well fitting work leg. I move a lot of soil around in my garden by shovel but would not move soil in a wheelbarow. I do use a wheelbarrow to move horse manure from a stall to the bucket of the tractor. Recently I have been hand digging my potato harvest which was exceptionally good this year.
Be well
Herb

Offline annieg

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2011, 12:58:12 PM »
You guys are amazing.  You do more physical work than many able bodied (ie: 2 legged) people I know.  They really have to make sturdy prosthetics for you!  I don't do much physical work myself unless you count keeping a 10 room house clean & working full time. Have a great day and Steve, I hope you solve your knee problem.  annieg
He who limps, still walks.

Offline Steve C

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2011, 06:40:42 AM »
The knee seems to be getting better! I'm thinking now it was a deep bruise on the kneecap from pushing a wheelbarrow uphill. I guess I should have had the topsoil dumped on top of the hill not the bottom!
As far as the work, I'm sure it's the same with Herb but the work just materializes with where I live and the life I have. Either I do it, or I have to pay someone else to. I guess my pride can't let me pay someone to do something I can do myself. If I lived in a city I probably wouldn't have this sort of work to do but country life can be a great way to find physical work.
My old leg usually lets me do it because of all the padding. That said I do sometimes pay for it. Like I mentioned earlier, in the evening while was working moving the soil I was forced to take the leg off because it hurt so much. I may not be able to work for hours on end anymore (I don't know which is worse, my lower back or the leg!) but I do what I can do.
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline chrysochloridae

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2011, 04:30:49 PM »
Hey steve, long time no see!

It's most likely to be the activity that you were carrying out that has caused this. when you are walking up and incline, the front of the socket will push back on your knee more as the heel won't be on the ground; the additional weight of the (i'm presuming full) wheelbarrow will mean that a larger force will be needed to propel you and the wheelbarrow up the hill; the hill itself will mean that even more force is required as you are fighting Gravity also.

If the leg has been fine for years then the above is the most likely cause. Adding padding can sometimes increase the pressure or a localised area as you will be further reducing the size of that socket.

It sounds bruised to me Steve, unfortunately, bruised bone takes a good while to heal (when i've kicked peoples elbows when Kickboxing my shins have taken ages to heel!)

If its an old leg then it might be worth having the foot and ankle checked as they will cause a mechanical deficit of the prosthesis. With your activity level, i'm sure you'd compensate for a mechanical deficit but this would put additional stress on your body and cause injury long term. Have you any idea what foot is it Steve?

Offline Steve C

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 08:28:38 AM »
I'm happy to report the leg is doing a lot better. The knee is nearly back to normal. I was digging ditches over the weekend and I don't recall much pain at all (besides my aching back). I'm not sure what kind of foot it is, I think it's a basic Blatchford (multiflex?). I tend to think the toe section is a bit worn out as I can bend the toes back fairly easily when the shoe is off. I can't complain too much though. This foot is the foot I took off an ill fitting leg years ago to put on my old leg. The leg was 'the old leg' even back then!
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline chrysochloridae

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2011, 06:07:51 PM »
The Multiflex is a pretty good all rounder, but they do get a bit worn after a while. They're notorious for the toes going soft after a while (especially if getting wet); the ankle unit that attaches to them (the ankle Ball and Snubber) needs replacement (i would suggest) at least once a year as the rubber degrades. The inner keel can begin to come away from the foot cosmesis after a while and this can also affect function.
I don't think a service would hurt! not expensive to replace the whole thing wither. The ankle snubber only costs about £5 if money is an issue (the snubber is usually the 1st thing to go!)
Glad you're on the mend Steve!

Offline stinker373

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Re: Knee problems
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2011, 09:58:43 PM »
Perhpas some of the boys can post pics of these work limbs so others could get an idea of what they might like to get.