Author Topic: Horse back riding for amps?  (Read 6612 times)

Offline Steve C

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Horse back riding for amps?
« on: August 15, 2011, 07:35:14 PM »
I'm thinking of learning to ride a horse. As a BKA are there any pitfalls or adaptations I would need to think about? For instance: stirrups, should they be modified to make it easier to pull my foot out in case of emergency?
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2011, 05:22:41 PM »
Steve, this is one area that has not been touch so it looks like it is going to be a trial and error go at it, it is also something that i have been thinking about for some time. Riding horses  is in my blood. was a pro at one time rode bull. bareback and saddlebronc, till i got busted up good from a bull. The only real problem i see is us with pin lock system with the release  pin to the inside, and accidentally releasing our legs some how, put have been told that it can be turn 45, 90 or even 100 degress if needed. The other thing is getting up on one with out a platform or a small ladder, dont know if i can lift me leg high enough to get my foot in the stirup and then do i have enough strenght to pull my body up aand get my other leg over the back of the saddle and horse,One other thing you might want to do is  let the horse smell and actually see one of your legs before attempting to ride.
you-all have a great day.

Offline ann

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2011, 09:24:20 PM »
Steve, I have a friend on HM forum....she rides horses.  Let me know if you want to post there....she has alot of imfo. plus she is an amputee peer person for the ACA.


If u want her to email u ~ give me an addy. she can write to ~ she is a RBK amputee.  She's married so I am not trying to set u up   ;) :-* ;)

Offline herb

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2011, 08:00:00 PM »
Hi Steve
I am hoping that you get some responses from above knee amputees. I do a little riding but am never comfortable for more than ten minutes or so. I can not keep my prosthetic foot in a stirrup and do not like my prosthesis flopping around when I ride. I have thought of using  a strap with velcro to keep my leg in place. When I do use a saddle I either mount with my flesh foot in the right side stirrup and swing my prosthesis over the horse. I usually just ride bareback and use a small step ladder to get on.
be well
herb

Offline Steve C

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2011, 05:27:13 AM »
Cheers all. I think my biggest worry was falling off and getting my leg caught in the stirrup. I was thinking bareback but I from what I know that is something for the more advanced rider. I probably have to stick with the saddle at first (around here they used the english style saddle).
Here are my ponies. Stoirm (on the left) about 6 years old and is a smaller type connemara pony. I don't know her history (would would be handy) but she seems pretty wild and nervous at the moment. When I got her she was living wild with a small herd 'up in the hills'. I'm bringing her in for training/breaking this week hopefully. While she's there I will take lessons myself. Hopefully we can combine the two and I can ride her there under controlled circumstances. My property is very hilly and stoney. If I fall off a lot at first I will be bouncing off boulders.



Stoirm (Irish/gaeilge for Storm) is on the left and the one I am going to train and ride. Púcán (which is Irish/gaelige for a small type of Irish boat) is the older horse that was rescued. She about 10 years old and was used to train children to ride in the past. She was very thin when I got her but is getting plumper by the minute.
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline chrysochloridae

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2011, 04:45:38 PM »
Steve, this comes up more than you'd think. I've had a few people riding, some with more success than others.

One person i see does dressage. He found a good farrier/saddler who made a modified stirrup out of leather (like a leather Number 8 socket attatched to a saddle!), the stump then fits into this. The person said that he had better proprioceptive feedback without the prosthesis and thus had more control of the horse. If you have an experienced Leather Working technician at your limb centre then they may be able to knock something up for you (you're prosthetist may get gutted about the paperwork involved with Risk Assessing such a thing though LOL!)

You have noted the main pitfalls of using conventional stirrups with prosthetic legs - you have no way of disengaging from the horse if you come off (unless you have lock and pin and can access the button) and this could be a BIG problem, however, if you use an unconventional system as described above, you have no protection for your stump(s) if you come off and so could damage the ends of your stumps and be unable to wear the prostheses.

Another solution i have tried is to wear a socket without the prosthesis and the above mentioned 'leather stump holster'; this gives you ability to disengage from the horse if required and alos the ability to walk on the socket(s) in an emergency.

I think your idea of bareback could work, but it might be uncomfortable and further affect your sitting balance. As you said, plenty of practice and familiarity training for the horse is a must before attempting them irish hillsides! Púcán sounds the better bet of the 2 as she has some familiarity with a riding situation, i'd imagine a wild horse may still have some of its wild instincts / tenancies....

Offline guzzitx

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2011, 10:54:17 PM »
I had a friend (an attorney and an engineer, one of the brightest folks I have ever known),
who swore he could judge a mans' intelligence by the number of horses he owned.

At the time, he described himself as 3-horse stupid.

Offline Steve C

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 07:18:33 AM »
Haha, I see his point. I'm only two horse stupid.

Mine aren't too bad, but not as friendly as the donkeys I used to have. Horses seem a bit nervous and mine are more nervous than most. I have two mares and they let me feed them but other than that they'd rather have me leave them alone.
A bit like most of the women I meet! :D
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline ann

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2011, 12:57:15 PM »
Haha, I see his point. I'm only two horse stupid.

Mine aren't too bad, but not as friendly as the donkeys I used to have. Horses seem a bit nervous and mine are more nervous than most. I have two mares and they let me feed them but other than that they'd rather have me leave them alone.
A bit like most of the women I meet! :D


Don't believe that for a minute folks.... ;)

Offline uScott

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2011, 03:38:40 PM »
Haha, I see his point. I'm only two horse stupid.

Mine aren't too bad, but not as friendly as the donkeys I used to have. Horses seem a bit nervous and mine are more nervous than most. I have two mares and they let me feed them but other than that they'd rather have me leave them alone.
A bit like most of the women I meet! :D

Hehehe...no, well, I'm glad I can say that while your horses are shy, not all horses are. Most of my in-laws own horses (some into the double digits...nice folks, though) and some of them are downright clingy -- if they smell any kind of food on you, or think they can get an ear scritch out of you, why they're your best buddy and will NOT leave you alone for a minute! It all depends on how they were raised. Give it time, treat them right and let them learn to trust you, they'll let you know when they do.

Offline Steve C

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2011, 09:07:53 AM »
My horses are shy to say the least. The little one (a shetland) is more trusting than the big one though. The larger one (a connemara) went through about 3 weeks of training when I was told that she will probably never be a friendly horse. Even after her training if I were to walk into into a small field she's in she'll run out as if in a panic. She must have either been treated badly or at her age (I was told by the trainer she must be 9-10, which is older than I thought initially) she's set in her ways. Maybe if I were to keep her for a years she'd calm down. I'm real gentle with them, so maybe that will work. Looking at her she seems like she may be pregnant. I wasn't told she was but either she's just putting on weight or before I got her some stallion did the wicked deed. If she is, hopefully I can get a nice friendly foal (if the foal doesn't get nervous from watching the mother...)
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline Dolphin

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Re: Horse back riding for amps?
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2012, 06:14:20 PM »
I have heard of a break away stirup, like they do for bike pedals.