Author Topic: Painful skin graphs  (Read 1487 times)

Offline Steve C

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • the west of Ireland
    • View Profile
Painful skin graphs
« on: July 20, 2011, 04:51:30 PM »
I dropped off my new leg to have the socket thickened so that they can take more off the inside for a better fit. I had been wearing it pretty much all the time as I cracked my socket on the old leg (again), but that I repaired with new fibreglas the night before. As I dropped it off they gave me my new liner and sleeve that I had ordered for the old leg. The liner seemed a bit tight but it was new and a tougher version so I expected it and I wore the old leg home. My old leg used to be the comfortable one but now I find that the skin graphs on the back of my knee are killing me. It makes it very painful to walk.

I assume its a matter of time before the leg gets used to the old leg and the new liner but are there any tricks to ease the pain until then?
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline annieg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2011, 06:50:01 PM »
Heavy drinking????
He who limps, still walks.

Offline Steve C

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • the west of Ireland
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2011, 07:46:40 PM »
While heavy drinking is usually my cure all, it won't work in this case.
I took off the leg in hopes my leg just needs some alone time sans prosthetic leg and I'm back to using the crutches. Problem is, I have a meeting tomorrow for a job where I need to be agile (normally not a problem for what they need) but if I limp, I don't get the job.

Of all the times for the leg to act up...
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline annieg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2011, 07:17:03 PM »
Steve, Timing is everything!  I hope your interview went well.  Is your leg feeling any better?  annieg
He who limps, still walks.

Offline Steve C

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • the west of Ireland
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2011, 05:39:18 AM »
The leg is better. I did some fiddling with the cotton sock layering and it seems to have calmed down (and the leg may have just gotten used to the new liner too).
It looks like I have the job. I do a bit of work on television either as a extra or in small roles in documentaries as historical figures. Portraying the Irish patriot Roger Casement in the documentary series 'Seactar na Casca' (The Easter Seven) and portraying the King of Leinster (the 'bad guy') in the documentary 'Cluain Tarbh' (the Battle of Clontarf) are the two roles I am most proud of.
The new job was for a small (non-reoccurring as far as I know) role in a children television programme. I will be a hula skirt wearing dancing caveman speaking gibberish. It'll be fun if not a bit embarrassing! I needed the leg feeling good as part of it calls for me to dance around a hostage child with the other cavemen.
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline herb

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 456
  • left above knee amputee New Hampshire USA
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2011, 08:17:46 AM »
Hi Steve - it really sounds like you need a new prosthetist. You should not be having pain with your prosthesis when you get home from their office. It sounds like you need a whole new socket. I have several skin grafts on my residual leg where there is little more than the skin graft covering my femur. My prosthetist bumps out my socket on those areas so there is no contact in those areas. I am curious about the spelling you use for grafts. Is skin graphs an irish or european version of skin grafts. i

Offline annieg

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2011, 06:42:23 PM »
Steve,  I would pay to see your new role! LOL We do what we have to so that we can keep working and eating.  I'm sorry we can't to see your other roles on this side of the pond.  annieg
He who limps, still walks.

Offline Steve C

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • the west of Ireland
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2011, 08:18:22 AM »
Herb, I'm starting to think that too. Strangely enough here in Ireland most prosthetists I have worked with are from either Australia or South Africa. This man is from Australia. He's very nice, when the new socket wasn't fitting right and I was still replying on my old leg, he gave me 3 new sleeves so that I could keep wearing it as he worked on the new leg (and as my sleeves wore out). The way he put it was that if the leg wasn't working, until it did he make sure I had what I needed until it was. Last time in, he gave me a whole packet of cotton socks for free as well... which I promptly forgot on the counter.

That said I'd rather have a new pain-free good fitting socket. I think the problem lay with the socket and liner combination. The liner I think is just too thin for my leg as it is. I need more padding. I'll give him some leeway with his building up the outside to take more out the inside to accommodate more socks. If, the newest work on the leg doesn't work the way I see it, he'll have no choice then to make a new socket.

My worry is that I have had the leg for over a year now. There were months that I got out of habit of wearing it and just went back to the old leg. I shouldn't have done that. I should have kept going back to get it right. If a new socket is made I might as well go for a thicker liner too. The thin liner was his idea, but I can't imagine getting a new liner for free and they're not cheap. I'm paying for the leg out of my own pocket.

Annieg- I started doing television/film work years ago. A amputee friend of mine from Dublin told me they were looking for amputees for the Bruckheimer film 'King Arthur'. I got the job but after 5 weeks on set I  ended up not even being used. It was mind numbingly boring at times but I enjoyed watching the process in which films are made. Since then I have been on a soap opera several times, one drama, one crime drama, a award winning documentary series, a (yet to be aired documentary) and now the children programme. It's all for a change of work. The art has gotten very slow and as you say
Quote
We do what we have to so that we can keep working and eating
. I must admit that I would be more into the more serious work but it'll be fun.
With my wardrobe incorporating a hula skirt this time I was curious to how they'd react to my prosthetic leg. They didn't care at all. I'll be wearing sandals as well so I may try and somehow expose the toes on my cosmetic foot (normally covered by the 'skin'). If the camera picks up a toeless foot it may turn a few heads!
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline herb

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 456
  • left above knee amputee New Hampshire USA
    • View Profile
Re: Painful skin graphs
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2011, 08:45:16 PM »
Hi Steve

With the high cost of anything to do with prosthetics, It is rough having to pay out of pocket. I thought Ireland had a national health care program that paid for all residents' medical care. When I had some surgery on my residual leg last year I was on crutches for a few months and my leg swelled some so I had to wear a shrinker for a while. It is essentially a tubular ace bandage. When I picked them up I thought it would be inexpensive and pulled out my wallet to pay. I was shocked to see that they cost around $200. My new socket cost over $11k. My out of pocket expense is 20%. I would have to do without is I had to pay 100% of my $50k c-leg.
be well
herb