Author Topic: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print  (Read 2034 times)

Offline Mitchee

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News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« on: September 02, 2009, 12:39:46 PM »

Here is a link to a strange news story about a man who was asked to provide a thumb print to cash a check.  The man doesn't have any hands and the bank refused to cash the check because he couldn't provide a thumb print.


http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=112587
Initial injury:  July 1985
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Offline herb

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2009, 03:36:01 PM »
Hi Michelle - Bank of America has got to be the most unreasonable, unfriendly bank to deal with. My ex uses that bank and they are constantly coming up with more and more fees. I have 2 home mortgages with them but no checking account with them. I recently went into a BOA office to cash a check drawn on BOA. Because I do not have a checking account with them, they charged $6 to cash the check. I would drive across town to a different bank rather than ever go in there again. Herb

Offline snowbear

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2009, 04:19:26 PM »
I was just going to post the same article..This is purely shameful This person needs a good education in sensitively training..No excuses for this..Its just very wrong!

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2009, 04:47:39 PM »
heres another one aboug BOA, back in the mid 70's i had my own business and had around 18,000.00 in my checking acount, wrote three checks to pay for some supplies and quess what all three bounced, got that straightened out and deposited another 10,000.00 and then walked down the street and wrote a 150.00 and two 300.00 checks and they bounced, here is what i did to them at the time the cash drawer was right underneath the counter and i had three pennies in my hand and when she turned around i slide them so that they fell into her cash drawer and the were there until after 1:00 that night trying to figure how come she was three cent off on her count that day, that was back when there in and out columns had to match to the exact penny. That was while i was withdrawing my money out and went to another bank, to do business with.

And in the eighties my wife had problems with them also, went in to withdraw money from her saving account and they told her that she didnt have any money in it, but yet her passbook said that she did, it took them two hours to straighten that out and i had my wife pull all of her money out and went accrossed the street to a differant bank.

If BOA was that last bank in the whole world i would keep my money in my own save rather than let them take care of it for me.
you-all have a great day.

Offline snowbear

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 08:08:38 PM »
BOA is truly a poor bank to do business with..

Offline JClark

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2009, 05:56:13 PM »
Speaking of bad banks..... I had an account with Key Banks.  (Michigan, Ohio and similar areas)

After 4 months of having my account drained by excessive fees, I spent my account down to $5.00 and opened a new account somewhere else.  A month later I went in to close the account, all the checks had cleared, etc.  The cashier asked why I was closing the account and I said "excessive fees".  She looked on the computer and because I'd had the account less than a year, they wanted to charge me $25.00 to close the account.  I told her she could take my $5.00 but I'd never give them another $20..... She thought about it and gave me the $5

My current bank doesn't seem to have any fees, and I like that.  Bank of America (and Key bank) are living the American Dream - making money any way they can.
North-East Pennsylvania
+Left foot------------+Right foot---------------+
|Accident 8/31/2002 |ankle fusion 1/8/2008  |
|Amp 7/11/2003      | RBK (Ertl)    4/7/2010 |
|Ertl June 2005        |                                  |
+---------------------+-------------------------+

Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2009, 01:46:35 AM »
Sounds like Bank of America - at least that branch - is very insensive.  Understandably they are using a thumbprint method for security.  Of course that only works if they have a fingerprint expert at each location - or sophisticated fingerprint scanning equipment.  I've never experienced that at any bank.

Needless to say, they have to have an alternative method of screening when thumb-printing is impossible.  A photo ID possibly?  A password and pin-number system?
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline JClark

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2009, 12:13:38 AM »
I don't think a finger printing expert is required.  If you have a finger print on file, anyone with minimal training can run your finger over the scanner (it's like a computer scanner, but smaller - no more ink for fingerprinting).  Computer software would check it against a finger print stored on file. 

I'm not sure about Bank of America, but prisons, police and other agencies I've been finger printed by say that if the finger they normally use is missing they just do a different one.  The local prison did the thumb and first finger on each hand so if I had a boo-boo I could just use a different finger.

The number of cases where someone is missing both hands has got to be a small percentage.  And for those, I think the bank should just be smart enough to do something different and more sensitive.  Perhaps a signature?  (he he he he!)  I'd personally not do business if they required a retinal scan - the eye doc has enough trouble doing an exam, I'm not going to let some soccer mom scan my eyeball with a laser beam.

Oh, and for the record, I was fingerprinted by the Army (using ink) at enlistment for my background check, a prison for some volunteer work and by the local school district administration to run criminal checks to make sure I'm safe to be around children in schools.  My brother still gets nervous when he hears me joking about my interviews with the FBI and my FBI file and various background checks.  Between the FBI and Army, I've never been turned down for a security check.

Sounds like Bank of America - at least that branch - is very insensive.  Understandably they are using a thumbprint method for security.  Of course that only works if they have a fingerprint expert at each location - or sophisticated fingerprint scanning equipment.  I've never experienced that at any bank.

Needless to say, they have to have an alternative method of screening when thumb-printing is impossible.  A photo ID possibly?  A password and pin-number system?
North-East Pennsylvania
+Left foot------------+Right foot---------------+
|Accident 8/31/2002 |ankle fusion 1/8/2008  |
|Amp 7/11/2003      | RBK (Ertl)    4/7/2010 |
|Ertl June 2005        |                                  |
+---------------------+-------------------------+

Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: News story - Bank asks man with no hands for thumb print
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2009, 11:57:08 AM »
Jason:

Yer right.  With modern technology, fingerprints can be scanned and digitized, and then transmitted anywhjere.

I remember the old ink on a card method.  As a pastor, and earlier as a social worker, I've visited several prisons in SE PA - state and county.  Only one actually requited a fingerprint.

Way back in my former life, I did some locksmithing and security work.  And for that I had fingerprints (whole sets) on file everywhere from the local police to the FBI.  So, I guess we're both "in the system".
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA