Author Topic: Fitting low friction shoes  (Read 2390 times)

Offline Joe A.

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Fitting low friction shoes
« on: August 06, 2009, 05:59:55 PM »
My doctor insists that I get a pair of diabetic shoes with a custom orthotic. I have had a couple pair of Apex Ambulators but can't see how you use them with a BK prostheses. The heel is way too high. Anyone have any tips?
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Offline ann

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2009, 09:54:15 AM »
Joe, can't your prosthetist lower the heel on your foot?  Or you could have a lift added to your good foot.  That might work for you if you have your prosthesis covered and don't want the skin removed.  :)

Offline Joe A.

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2009, 05:00:04 PM »
I suppose so but the question would be can a limb be retrofit with these shoes? A practitioner would have no trouble making a new leg using them. The problem, to me, seems to be the high platform of the sole along with an even higher heel. I see them as dangerous to my biological leg.
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Offline ann

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2009, 07:57:07 PM »


'Joe', are you trying to tell me you don't sing soprano  :D ;D :D !!  I would say you look @ a pair that are lower heeled...surely they have more than one style to pick out of.   If not, maybe you can get a script for over the counter shoes that have been modified especially for diabetics.

Offline naseigfried

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2009, 02:11:07 PM »
There really isn't a lot to choose from in Diabetic shoes. They are all big toe boxes with thick heavy soles. Doesn't sound good for amputees. I would just stick with a good, well-fitting pair of New Balance.
LBK since April 2004

Offline Joe A.

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2009, 02:45:53 PM »
I think I will stay with New Balance. I have always liked them.
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Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2009, 03:00:59 PM »
Joe:

As they say, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."  If you have a brand of shoes that work for you, why change?

You might ask your doc just why he/she is pushing for the diabetic shoes - that is, what will those shoes do that your present ones can't (besides cost a bundle)?

Second, chack with your leg man and see what he recommends for a diabetic amputee.  Gotta consider BOTH legs in this, right?
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline chrysochloridae

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2009, 02:42:55 PM »
Most prosthetic feet have a 10mm accommodation for heel height and so long as you're not wearing 6" stiletto heels, your prosthetist should be able to adjust the pitch of the foot to fit a shoe.

I usually advise people to find a style of shoe that they like and that fits their remaining foot, then buy 3 pairs in varying colours and that way you should avoid problems due to varying heel heights on shoes. You could get an adjustable heel device e.g. http://www.endolite.co.uk/products/ankles/brio/brio.html  or http://www.ossur.co.uk/prosthetics/feet/elation 

Alternatively, if you have the money (and i don't know how this will be affected by the proposed Healthcare reforms) you could consult an orthotist to measure, manufacture and fit a pair of custom diabetic spec shoes for you.

The shoes that you have seem ok Joe. Sometimes you are better off keeping it simple as shoes that claim to 'work with the biomechanics of the body' can work against the actions of the prosthetic foot, e.g. i made a prosthetic limb for a chap and he went away with it and was happy, he came back a month or so later and was walking appallingly; after a good half hour of checking the alignment and being a bit baffled, i found the insole that his orthotist had made and inserted into the shoe on the prosthetic side (the week after he had taken the prosthetic leg - needless to say that the arch support didn't improve his walk on the prosthetic side!
 

Offline tbrbeast

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2009, 05:59:07 PM »
As a diabetic and bilat TMA, I deal with shoe issues all the time.  Quite frankly, I see very little reason for most diabetics, including an amputee like myself, to buy diabetic shoes.  As has been noted/implied, styles leave a lot to be desired.  Either buy off-the-shelf or go custom made.  If you buy off-the-shelf, look for shoes with a tall and wide toe box.  New Balance and Brooks are 2 that I know for a fact make models that fit that criteria.  This is one situation where it pays to go to a store where the salespeople are knowledgeable in shoes and fitting them.  You can buy cheap and without good advice/help but as diabetics, the risk just isn't worth it.  Once you find something that fits, make sure your orthotic fits.  Those 2 items are the primary criteria I use when I buy footwear and I have been buying off-the-shelf since becoming an amp 5 1/2 years ago. 

When I get a prescription for new orthoses, I tell my surgeon what types of footwear I am looking at these being used with.  He has written the type on the scrip for the orthotist.  I am seriously exploring starting XC skiing again which is likely to require a different or modified orthosis for each foot.  But for most footwear, my experience suggests that if I am dealing with a tall and wide toe box, then my orthoses are likely to fit most footwear without little or no problem.

I think your orthotist and prosthetist need to talk and coordinate their work.  One shouldn't be making/adjusting one side without a comparable adjustment/compensation (or at least a check to verify no problems or changes are necessary) at the same time. 

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2009, 09:17:15 AM »
When i get a new pair of shoes, no matter who  made them after i get them the first place i go is my CPO, to have my legs adjusted to my new shoes,
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Offline tbrbeast

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2009, 05:18:23 PM »
Joe - Saw a posting on another amp site where someone just got a new leg and was looking for new footwear.  He listed a couple of shoe brands that apparently work quite well for amputees.  Here they are:

   Spira Footwear; and
   Z-Coil.

I don't buy footwear over the internet for obvious reasons so I was concerned about finding local, reputable stores that carry these brands.  Both brands have stores in a reasonable proximity to me (within 200 miles) and which sell footwear or footwear related items (more likely to have knowledgeable staff).  Both have athletic and walking shoes; Spira also has a hiking boot.  I am going to check both of these out and may also be worthwhile for you.



Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Fitting low friction shoes
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2009, 09:34:44 PM »
I am a bilateral BK amp, so I don't have to be concermed about a remaining biological foot.  I just bought a pair of Timberland shoes.  The heel height seems identical with my old shoes, so no need to rush off to my prosthetists to adjust heel height.

Funny thing, tho.  After leaving the shoe store, my wife asked how the new shoes felt.  I told her they feel a little tight and stiff , as new shoes might.  ???  How can that be?  My prosthetic feet don't have feelings, right?  Power of suggestion??   :)  In reality, everything's fine.
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA