Author Topic: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)  (Read 9176 times)

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2008, 11:52:31 AM »
I would tend to use crutches the odd time and the chair a bit less. I find I cannot carry even a cup of coffee when using crutches which would make me use the chair. I like being self sufficient and not have to ask someone to bring me things.

He will learn how to walk again using the prosthesis. Learning to walk is not done in one day. He'll wear it for a little bit one day and get used to it. He may have spots that get sore and the leg will need to adjusted. Then he'll take it off till the next day where he'll wear it a bit longer. He'll learn how to walk on inclines, steps etc. Chances are he will over do it one day and may need to not wear the leg for a few days while a abrasion heals. It will feel like the end of the world but we all go through it. At least I did.

As far as 'hopping around' to get places. I was always told not to. It puts alot of strain on the ankle. When you only

got one, take care of it.


Now this is a art  I  can do. Ican not only Carrie a cup of coffee with crutches but a bowl of cereal too! But I learned to use crutches at age 2! :D

Offline Steve C

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2008, 11:59:22 AM »
Quote
Now this is a art  I  can do. Ican not only Carrie a cup of coffee with crutches but a bowl of cereal too! But I learned to use crutches at age 2!

If I were to try that (which I have) I would be cleaning the carpet soon after! :D
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2008, 12:07:58 PM »
Well I can Carrie on at a time! Not both unless I knee walk. But then I wear holes in my PJ's! ;D

Offline herb

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2008, 05:02:55 PM »
Hi Gold Mole - The c-leg warranty  requirements may be different in the US than than the UK. I have only needed to return my cleg once per year for the first 3 years. They have always given me a loaner to use and have done all repairs at no cost for those first 3 years. After 3 years the repairs are very expensive. I was fortunate to getover  6 years of use before I had to pay for any repairs. The battery on my cleg lasts for 30 hours without needing a recharge. I charge it every night so it a dead battery is not an issue. A few times while traveling the battery has gone dead because I was not able to recharge it for more than 3 days. It fails in what they call a safe mode which still allows you to walk with the leg. When I am camping I carry a charger which will work off a 12 volt battery. Herb

Offline ann

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2008, 05:32:13 PM »
OK 'snowbear' what about going to the bathroom @ night...what do you use....knees, crutches,  ??  .

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2008, 05:50:17 PM »
knees! Our bathroom is right off the bedroom. But My dog likes to lay right in front of the door. So I huddle over him. :D

Offline Genki_rockets

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2008, 07:49:53 PM »
I am an above knee amputee in my late 30's.  Losing a leg as an adult is very different from losing a leg as an adolescent or even as a teenager.  When youngsters lose thier leg, they don't need gait training.  They just start walking with prosthetics.     

PTs specializing in gait training will tell you that for an adult, it would take anywhere from 6 months to 9 months just to become comfortable walking with prosthetic.  Please tell your brother to be patient and don't expect to start walking again the next day.  It won't happen.

C-leg is a great leg as is but there is a new version that's coming out next year.  For me, more than anything, what C-leg offers is this security knowing that it's brain will catch me from stumbling and falling.  I can actually walk faster with my other mechanical leg that's lighter than the C-leg.  But I stay with C-leg because that's my preference.  I would rather take secured step each time, albeit slower.

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2008, 08:37:28 PM »
Very true. Amputation was suggested many times to my parents when I was child. They freaked and choose many unsuccessful operations, braces, cast pins, rods, fixaters, you name it. 17 in all. I had a condition in which the tibia is bowed and breaks very easily. Mine broke at 8 months old in a cast! ::)I ad many operations in attempt to  help it mend. With no luck even with tradition bone graphs bones were taken form my hip at age 7 and aging at age 13. It still never mended I was in a plaster leg cast for up to 3 years for each operation or a long metal leg brace. My leg was deformed, scared, and 4 size difference in shoes. Just 5 years ago in my late 30's I developed a major bone infection and had no choice but to amputate to save my life. I have a ton of phantom pain and real pain I have the same exact pain I had before I lost the leg even though its gone. unfortunately the more pain a person had before amputation the more will remain after. If amputation took place as a child I would have escaped all the miserable operations and be much better off today. Intrestin I had to have it amputated after all that. It would have been much more wiser to amputate as a child or teen. Today some parents are choosing amputation rather than all the useless operations. and they are making a very good choice. Trust me been there done that! :)


Offline Fi

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2008, 12:18:55 AM »
Hello,

I lost my leg when I was 27 as a result of an accident too. I am 31 now, so am your brother's age. I am a below the knee amputee so can't comment on his gear, but I can comment on the ups and downs of the rehab process and how long it took for me to be comfortable with my leg etc.

I was in a bad position when I first lost my leg, having also broken my femur on the same leg. This meant that I couldn't get a prosthetic until the femur healed which took 6 months. For that reason, by the time I finally got my first leg, all my muscles had wasted away, and I found it difficult to walk with. It took me about a year after getting my first leg to be able to walk without a stick or crutches, but all the work was worth it. Since then I have managed to get my life back completely to where it was before, and have probably actually done more stuff than I may have otherwise. My way back to fitness was to start cycling. Initially I would cycle to work - 7 miles there and back, and eventually I managed to start doing longer multi day rides in various places around the world. It was great therapy for me, far better than boring physiotherapy, and really gave me the realisation that the only limits in life are those you place on yourself.

Nearly 4 years later I hike regularly, cycle lots, go to the gym lots, and am even running with the use of a special running leg. I have also travelled around the world extensively, and have managed to hold down a demanding full time job all the while.

So please tell your brother not to worry, and that with a little bit of determination and a lot of optimism, he will be OK eventually.

Having said that, there will be hard times ahead. For me I hit a wall about 3 months after the amputation. Before that I had all the attention in the world from my family and friends, was treated fantastically by the hospitals and rehab people I used to go to, and being a bit of an extrovert was loving it. By the three month mark however I had returned home to the flat I was sharing with my boyfriend and had gone back to work trying to get back to normal. It was difficult. I was on crutches and also on nerve pain medicine that made me really drowsy and gave me spots. I was also realising that what had happened to me had mentally affected me more than I perhaps had realised immediately after the accident, and I really couldn't concentrate on my job at all.

I remember one afternoon (not one of my finest moments), having lunch in the pub with a couple of friends. It was about a 15 minute walk back to my friend's flat and they insisted on putting me in the wheelchair because it was quite a long way to crutch, esp after a few glasses of wine. It was my first time in a wheelchair since leaving hospital (I was quite stubborn), and I just couldn't handle it at all and started shouting at everyone who I thought was staring at me on street. That was when I realised that maybe I wasn't handling things quite as well as I had previously thought. Looking back I am appaled and ashamed of my reaction to things that day, as I'm honestly not like that at all, but that for me was the point when the reality of the situation, and the fact that things would never be the same again, really hit me.

After that the next few months weren't great, and to be totally honest even getting the leg was a bit of an anticlimax. It hurt to walk, and it was bit and clumpy, none of my trousers fit over it, and I couldn't wear high heels. Gradually though things improved. 5 months after getting the leg my boyfriend and I had our first weekend away, to Florence, and I managed to walk around all day long with the leg on and only a stick. That felt like a big achievement, and I gradually got more and more adventurous after that.

The year anniversary then came up, and that again was difficult. I couldn't stop thinking about where I had been this time the year before, and the fact that I was still hobbling around usiing sticks and crutches, and that it hurt all the time, was incredibly depressing. It didn't help that what happened to me happened on boxing day, so it was around xmas, the time when everyone is meant to be enjoying themselves.

After that though things really started getting better. People say that the first year is the worst and that really is true. By the second anniversary of my accident I had taken up cycling, had started running, was walking everywhere relatively without pain, had given the stick up, and had spent a month travelling around Asia on my own, and I was completely and utterly on top of the world, feeling like I had conquered it.

Since then things have got better and better, and honestly now it is all good.

So that's my experience. Please feel free to share it with your brother. I would imagine that it reflects a lot of other people here's experiences as well. Tell him to remember in the down days that things will get better with time, and that he is the person, and the only person, in control of what happens to him. He is the only one who can turn what happened to him into a positive, and that he will be happier than ever if he can manage to do it.

Good luck!

Fi

Offline ann

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2008, 07:38:54 AM »
'Fi' do I remember you telling someone when riding a bicyle not to put your leg with your prosethsis down first...you would fall over?

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2008, 12:36:13 PM »
I ride a bike and put my prosthetic leg down fist. and I'm fine. :)

Offline ann

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2008, 07:16:36 PM »
'snowbear' that's good news...I thought someone said the opposite.   ;) ann

snowbear

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2008, 07:28:40 PM »
 :) I ques it all depends on the balance of someone and we are all different!

Offline Fi

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #28 on: October 27, 2008, 10:22:44 PM »
Ann,

When I ride a bike I have my prosthetic foot in a toe clip. My saddle is also fairly high up. This means that if I were to try to put my prosthetic foot down onto the floor when trying to stop before my real foot there would be one of two consequences: either

(a) the foot would not come out of the toe clip and I'd fall over onto the right hand side with my foot stuck in the pedal; or

(b) I would be able to get the foot out but in trying to put it down would end up doing some severe damage to my nether regions on the cross bar.

I somehow feel as if you may be victimising me.

I have had enough of both of you now and of this forum and am signing off for good.

Up with Obama and down with ignorance and bare stupidity.

Offline Myffanwy

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Re: Introducing myself (my brother is a recent AKA)
« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2008, 12:21:42 AM »
Oh, Fi, what happened there?  Is this Brit humour?  Are you kidding?  Am I too Canadian to get it?  Is there a post missing?  Please don't sign off, Fi....... :'(