Author Topic: Amps in the News 3  (Read 4411 times)

Offline Steve C

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Amps in the News 3
« on: July 30, 2008, 06:28:57 AM »
Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2008, 09:06:55 AM »
Steve, great story, that what i like about the EU countries, they have to know how and the means to try this kind of operation, Here in the good old USA the FDA would tie this up for years before letting it happen over here. Most of the new things like this come from over there, just because of the FDA, AND AMA. docs are too scared of getting sued if something goes wrong.
you-all have a great day.

Offline JClark

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2008, 10:34:48 AM »
North-East Pennsylvania
+Left foot------------+Right foot---------------+
|Accident 8/31/2002 |ankle fusion 1/8/2008  |
|Amp 7/11/2003      | RBK (Ertl)    4/7/2010 |
|Ertl June 2005        |                                  |
+---------------------+-------------------------+

Offline pyourke

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2008, 04:25:20 PM »
Definitely it will be interesting to follow this story. Hopefully there are future reports on how this fellow adapts to the new limbs and what progress is made in regaining control of the muscles and feeling in them. Steve, be sure to post any followup stories.
Peter
BAK since '74

Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2008, 04:33:26 PM »
Jason:

If these arms end up working, I suspect the recipient will get used to the appearance.  Just consider the wrinkles and other signs of age.  Place the hands of a 19 year old next to hands of a 54 year old, and notice the difference.  Also, how well matched us the skin complexion?

Then, of course, rejection is always a problem.  I suppose one major medical breakthru that will come sometime in the future, is a way to re-program the human body to accept another DNA as if it were one's own.  Indeed, even more than one "adopted" DNA, that way a person could accept more than one donated organ or part from diffetrent donors.

Consider all the medical discoveries we accept as "normal" today.  Consider whay may be discovered in the future.
 
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline Fi

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2008, 11:11:08 PM »
That is pretty amazing.

I have to admit though the thought of having someone else's hand or even foot attached to me makes me feel quite sick.....don't really know why. It just seems wrong somehow.

Offline Myffanwy

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2008, 05:03:31 AM »
Me, too, Fi.  It's like if the replaced part is inside you, well, you don't see it, do you?  But looking down at someone else's hand....hmm, that sounds like a creepy movie I saw once...yikes! 

Offline pyourke

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2008, 03:06:27 PM »
There was a hand transplant, in I think France, that was successful, but the guy couldn't get used to the hand not being his and he went back in and had it removed. I would think that both arms might be difficult, specially as it was reported that it could take as long as two years for the nerves to regrow so that he'd have use of his hands. In the meanwhile, carrying around two usless appendages might be somewhat hard to get used to. It will be quite an adjustment. I can only wish the guy all the best with his recovery. As of today's news report, the operation was successful and the doctors are pleased with the results so far.

I'm not sure that I'd be willing to consider a leg transplant if it took two years to regain feeling and movement. What would you do in the meanwhile? 
Peter
BAK since '74

Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2008, 05:06:14 PM »
Is having someone else's hand/foot/arm/leg creepy?  I suppose there's lots of non-amputees out there who think that being an amputee creepy enough.

Remember that we amputees have gotten used to it, right?

I suspect that many transplantees get used to it, too.

Now a face transplant.  That has got to be a whole new experience, eh?  On the other hand, I recall that face transplant recipient had been a burn victim - and the new face would be a distinct improvement in appearance - even if a different look.

Obviously, all these innovative transplants are breaking new fronteers in medicine.
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline Steve C

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Re: Amps in the News 3 update
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2008, 05:13:10 PM »
Update from friday night.

A team of surgeons successfully attached two complete arms to a 54 year-old man in a 15-hour operation

The male patient, 54, was "doing well under the circumstances" after the 15-hour operation last month, said Dr Christoph Hoehnke, one of the lead surgeons at the Isar clinic in Munich.
Dr Hoehnke told reporters he was deeply moved as the wife of the amputee - his name is being withheld - went to his bedside after the operation and instinctively reached for his hands.
He said that she remarked: "They look just like they used to".

Five teams working in two operating rooms gathered at 10:00 pm the night of the operation, divided between the patient and the donor, who had died only hours before.

The first step was to expose the muscle, nerves and blood vessels to be connected. Before the bones of the donor could be cut, blood vessels in his arms were filled with a cooled preservation solution.

Both arms were then removed exactly at the point matching the patient's arm stumps. First the bones were joined, then arteries and veins to ensure blood circulation as quickly as possible.
"The arms quickly resumed their rosy colour," a clinic spokeswoman said.
The patient was in a good condition but it could take two years before he "really has feeling in his fingertips again" because the transplanted nerves must still grow, she added.

Renowned surgeon Professor Edgar Biemer, 65, led the operation with Dr Hoehnke.
Dr Biemer explained the marathon surgery, saying: "The medical staff was divided into five teams.

Two teams removed one arm from the donor each, two further teams in the neighbouring operating theatre prepared the patient. The fifth team removed veins from the donor which we had to transplant to allow for a better blood flow.

"Then we joined the bones with screws and bars. Under the microscope we could connect the main artery of the arm with a large vein.

"In addition we were successful in connecting up the fire most important nerves in the arm with the shoulder. But that is only the outer casings. The nerves must grow into the arms. Such nerves grow only very slowly so it could take up to two years before he gets feeling in his fingertips."

Transplant technology was accelerating at a "rapid pace," he said. In November, 2005,
Frenchwoman Isabelle Dinoire, 38, was given a partial face transplant after being savaged by her dog when she passed out after taking sleeping pills.

Eighteen months later, she was able to smile and "confident of walking down the streets".

Therapists treating the Munich patient said how he copes psychologically with the arms of a 19-year-old as he approaches pensionable age will just one of the hurdles he must overcome.

"He will have to come to terms with the fact that extremely useful organs that he has been without for so long are back but that they are those of a much younger person," one therapist said.
"We shall have to tell him to take it easy on the weightlifting - getting younger arms might make him feel the years have slipped away but it won't have much affect on his physical strength."

As Dr Biemer put it: "He won't play the piano but otherwise he will live much better than before."
The patient will remain in the hospital for five weeks of intensive therapy before being allowed to go home.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/2486203/Pictures-of-world-first-double-arm-transplant.html

Where ever I go, I'll always have one foot in Ireland   /   I'm not a complete fool. Some parts are missing.

Offline JClark

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2008, 11:13:38 PM »
As of today's news report, the operation was successful and the doctors are pleased with the results so far. 

Doctors consider something successful on a much different method than patients.  My foot was successfully reattached.  It was on for more than a few weeks and blood/circulation eventually returned to normal.  the fact that I couldn't use it and ended up with a chop didn't matter to their statistics.  Same for "theguywiththehook" when they reattached his hand.

I and understand the despression that comes from hearing (after the fact) that it may take 2 years before these lumps of flesh might start to work.  They're currently telling me that my post-fusion ankle pain may take up to 2 years before I get past the wanting to vomit it hurts so much level.

Incidentially, I read today of a kid who had his arm (removed at the shoulder) dug out of the aligator and reattached.  No prognosis yet on his recovery....
North-East Pennsylvania
+Left foot------------+Right foot---------------+
|Accident 8/31/2002 |ankle fusion 1/8/2008  |
|Amp 7/11/2003      | RBK (Ertl)    4/7/2010 |
|Ertl June 2005        |                                  |
+---------------------+-------------------------+

Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2008, 08:53:43 PM »
Jason:

This whole amputation - transplantation - re-attachment topic is a mixed bag, to say the least.  I remember how long yopu worked to save that foot, but.....

This whole notion of what doctors consider success or failure, dosen't always agree with how WE see it.  Doctors would consider my two BK amps a double-failure.  The fact that we got rid of the gangrene and osteomyelitis - thus saving my life - I consider a royal success!  Gotta consider quality of life - the ability to lead an enjoyable, meaningful life.

Wadda-ya-saym folks>  It's back to the ol' Glass-Half-Full and Glass-Half-Empty situation.  :)   :)
Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline Fi

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2008, 12:27:29 AM »
You're dead right Dick,

I really do hope for the guy's sake that it all works out and that he is eventually able to use his new arms and hands, and I applaud the courage it must have taken to put him in the doctor's hands (no pun intended). And I also know that without pioneering operations like this there wouldn't be much if any progress made in medical care. However, I wouldn't want the guinea pig to be me.

That sounds terribly selfish doesn't it?


Offline Dick Stevens

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2008, 01:19:01 AM »
Fi:

Selfish?  Not really.  My sentiments exactly.

Dick Stevens, DBKA in PA

Offline pegleg jack

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Re: Amps in the News 3
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2008, 08:35:15 AM »
TO ALL, have been following this and i feel that guy has the biggest set of guts in the world. i my self i dont think that i could go through all the pain and uncertiany that goes with it. I wish him all the luck that i can muster and my prays go out to him that it works out for him.
you-all have a great day.